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Things to Do in Oman

The Arabian Peninsula nation of Oman combines an ancient Middle Eastern spirit with a modern appearance. Port capital Muscat is home to landmarks such as the Muttrah Corniche and the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque, as well as plentiful people watching in Old Muscat’s cafes. The Al Hajar Mountains culminate in Jebel Shams, the country’s highest peak, which rewards with panoramic views. History-steeped Nizwa, once Oman’s capital, features an ancient souk and a 17th-century fortress begging to be explored. No trip to Oman is complete without a foray into the Wahiba Sand Desert, best seen from atop a camel or in a 4x4 vehicle.
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Amouage Factory and Visitors’ Centre
10 Tours and Activities

In 2012, the Amouage Perfumery opened in Muscat as a visitor center to celebrate three decades of this niche luxury brand of fragrance. Here you can discover the most expensive perfume in the world, which draws inspiration from the rich and colorful heritage of the Sultanate of Oman. For shopping fanatics, the Amouage Perfumery is best enjoyed as part of an Arabian shopping trip and souq experience. Once at the perfume factory, a guide will explain how the perfumes are made by hand and you can watch as the bottles are filled and packaged by the small team who work here, perhaps even purchasing a bottle to take home for yourself. If visiting as part of a shopping and souq tour, you’ll then get to visit two modern shopping centers, before finishing up at the most popular and largest bazaar in Oman, the Muttrah Souq. Did You Know? The Amouage Perfumery has the capability to produce anything upwards of 5000 bottles of fragrance per week.

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More Things to Do in Oman

Nizwa

Nizwa

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111 Tours and Activities
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Wadi Shab (Shab Valley)

Wadi Shab (Shab Valley)

80 Tours and Activities
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Muttrah Souq (Mutrah Souk)

Muttrah Souq (Mutrah Souk)

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75 Tours and Activities
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Al Alam Palace (Sultan's Palace)

Al Alam Palace (Sultan's Palace)

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67 Tours and Activities

With its funnel-like gold and blue pillars and lone flagpole extending like an antenna from its flat roof, Al Alam Palace (Sultan's Palace) is one of Oman’s most striking examples of contemporary Islamic architecture. The palace, built in 1972, is set between the Mirani and Jalali forts along the coast of Muscat’s Old Town and is one of six royal residences belonging to His Majesty Sultan Qaboos.

Over the years, the ceremonial palace has received a number of important visitors, including Queen Elizabeth of England and Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, as well as hosting a number of official functions and ceremonies. Although the palatial buildings are closed to the public, visitors can still enjoy views of Imam Sultan bin Ahmed’s masterpiece from the surrounding palace gardens or the waterfront of the nearby Muscat Port.

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Wahiba Sands (Sharqiyah Sands)

Wahiba Sands (Sharqiyah Sands)

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35 Tours and Activities
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Nakhal (Nakhl)

Nakhal (Nakhl)

18 Tours and Activities
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Bahla

Bahla

23 Tours and Activities
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Al Jalali Fort

Al Jalali Fort

20 Tours and Activities

One of a pair of 16th-century ports perched on the coastal cliffs surrounding the Old Town of Muscat, the dramatic stronghold of Al Jalali Fort is one of the city’s most prominent landmarks. Built by the Portuguese in 1587, both Al Jalali and its neighbor, Al Mirani Fort, played important roles in the years of Portuguese colonization before being reclaimed by the Omani in the mid 17th century.

Today, the hilltop fortress houses a private museum set up by Sultan Qaboos bin Said to showcase items of Oman’s national heritage to visiting dignitaries and heads of state. Reached by a stairwell cut into the rocks or by cable car, the mighty fortress hosts a number of military parades and city celebrations, but remains closed to the public except for special events.

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Al Mirani Fort

Al Mirani Fort

12 Tours and Activities

Looking down over Muscat’s Old Town from its cliff top perch, the mighty Al Mirani Fort is one of Oman’s most striking landmarks, guarding the entrance to Muscat Bay. Built in the 16th century, along with the neighboring Al Jalali Fort, the fort is one of the most significant structures left over from the years of Portuguese colonization and was occupied by Portuguese troops until Imam Sultan bin Saif recaptured it in 1649, spearheading the decline of the city’s Portuguese rule.

Restored and extended in the 19th century, the fortress of Al Mirani is the larger of the two forts and makes an impressive backdrop for those exploring the Old Town or strolling along the Muttrah Corniche. Despite its popularity though, the fort is closed to the public and visitors will have to make do with taking in the views from the outside.

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Tiwi

Tiwi

15 Tours and Activities
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Al-Hajar Mountains

Al-Hajar Mountains

6 Tours and Activities
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Muttrah Corniche

Muttrah Corniche

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3 Tours and Activities
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Al Hazm Castle

Al Hazm Castle

4 Tours and Activities

Al Hazm Castle is an impressive structure—one of the best examples of Islamic architecture in Oman. It is known as one of the most famous historical landmarks in the country. Built by Imam Sultan bin Seif II (whose tomb is still within the fort walls) in the early 18th century, it was recently renovated and restored — just opened again to the public at the end of 2013.

Approaching the castle, visitors are led to a massive wooden door, intricately carved with script and design. The roof of Al Hazm is uniquely held by columns, as opposed to the traditional wooden supports. On the exterior, there are two fortified towers to see, along with a collection of artillery and cannons. Inside there are the grand living quarters of the Imam, including a kitchen, a courtyard, and a madrassah—a Qur’anic school. The castle is on the tentative list for inclusion as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

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