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Fuli Bridge
Fuli Bridge

Fuli Bridge

Upstream of Yulong River, Yangshuo, China

The Basics

Although located only a short distance from the very popular Yulong Bridge, the Fuli Bridge is somewhat of a hidden gem, overlooked by many visitors to the area. Since bamboo rafts rarely make it this far upriver and it’s well off the tourist-bus circuit, travelers will often find themselves alone at the bridge (or sharing it with some local village children swimming in the shallow waters). While big tour groups rarely visit, it is possible to see the bridge with a guide. A stop here is sometimes included in guided photography tours of the region, as well as multi-day small-group biking trips (you’ll stop for a cooling swim, just like the locals).

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Fuli Bridge offers a quieter alternative to the busier Yulong Bridge.

  • Don’t forget to bring your camera, as this spot is extremely photogenic.

  • Bring sun protection, along with a towel and bathing suit in case you decide to go for a swim.

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How to Get There

Fuli Bridge can be found about 7 miles (12 kilometers) outside of Yangshuo along the Yulong River. It’s easiest to simply rent a bicycle or scooter and head there via the village of Yantang. Another option is the Yangshuo–Jinbao bus, which makes a stop at Jinlong Bridge. From there, you can walk north the rest of the way.

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When to Get There

The best weather for enjoying the outdoors while biking along the Yulong River tends to fall between April and June or September and October. It’s typically too cold to swim in winter (December to March).

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Bridges of China

Stone-arch bridges, such as the Fuli Bridge, are the most common type of bridge you’re likely to see in China. Lurenqiao, the oldest such bridge, was built near Luoyang Palace in AD 282. While the bridges across the Yulong River typically only have a single arch, the Baodaiqiao bridge in Suzhou has 53 arches.

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